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Parents Who Acknowledge and Validate Emotions Have Emotionally Healthier Kids

What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study which means researchers didn’t change anything in the lives of the participants, but rather just asked them questions on different surveys and then used statistical methods to analyze the strength of associations between the answers.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how parents’ beliefs around emotions were related to their kindergarten-age kids’ ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave a bunch of surveys to 73 parents with kindergarten-age kids. The surveys asked about parents’ beliefs around emotions (for example, how important emotions are in life; whether they should be ignored or validated; which emotions are ok to express, etc.) and about how their kids typically respond to emotionally triggering events, like when another child takes away their toy. The researchers then used statistical methods to analyze how strongly associated parent beliefs were to children’s ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the more strongly parents believed in accepting and engaging with their child’s emotions, the healthier and more pro-social children’s emotional behaviors were.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Minimizing, ignoring, or punishing expressions of negative emotions backfire and may lead to emotional behaviors that are socially problematic. The best strategies for raising emotional vibrant and healthy kids is to acknowledge their emotions, help them label what they’re feeling, and help them problem solve to get to the root of their big emotions.

To dig deeper, check out our articles on emotional processing, emotional disconnection, and self-reparenting.

Original article:
Meyer S, Raikes HA, Virmani EA, Waters S, Thompson RA. Parent emotion representations and the socialization of emotion regulation in the family. International Journal of Behavioral Development. 2014;38(2):164-173. doi:10.1177/0165025413519014

Parents Who Acknowledge and Validate Emotions Have Emotionally Healthier Kids

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Parents Who Acknowledge and Validate Emotions Have Emotionally Healthier Kids

When our kids express intense negative emotions, we sometimes minimize or ignore these emotions. This research study suggests acknowledging and validating intense negative emotions helps kids become emotionally healthier.

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What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study which means researchers didn’t change anything in the lives of the participants, but rather just asked them questions on different surveys and then used statistical methods to analyze the strength of associations between the answers.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how parents’ beliefs around emotions were related to their kindergarten-age kids’ ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave a bunch of surveys to 73 parents with kindergarten-age kids. The surveys asked about parents’ beliefs around emotions (for example, how important emotions are in life; whether they should be ignored or validated; which emotions are ok to express, etc.) and about how their kids typically respond to emotionally triggering events, like when another child takes away their toy. The researchers then used statistical methods to analyze how strongly associated parent beliefs were to children’s ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the more strongly parents believed in accepting and engaging with their child’s emotions, the healthier and more pro-social children’s emotional behaviors were.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Minimizing, ignoring, or punishing expressions of negative emotions backfire and may lead to emotional behaviors that are socially problematic. The best strategies for raising emotional vibrant and healthy kids is to acknowledge their emotions, help them label what they’re feeling, and help them problem solve to get to the root of their big emotions.

To dig deeper, check out our articles on emotional processing, emotional disconnection, and self-reparenting.

Original article:
Meyer S, Raikes HA, Virmani EA, Waters S, Thompson RA. Parent emotion representations and the socialization of emotion regulation in the family. International Journal of Behavioral Development. 2014;38(2):164-173. doi:10.1177/0165025413519014

What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study which means researchers didn’t change anything in the lives of the participants, but rather just asked them questions on different surveys and then used statistical methods to analyze the strength of associations between the answers.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how parents’ beliefs around emotions were related to their kindergarten-age kids’ ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave a bunch of surveys to 73 parents with kindergarten-age kids. The surveys asked about parents’ beliefs around emotions (for example, how important emotions are in life; whether they should be ignored or validated; which emotions are ok to express, etc.) and about how their kids typically respond to emotionally triggering events, like when another child takes away their toy. The researchers then used statistical methods to analyze how strongly associated parent beliefs were to children’s ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the more strongly parents believed in accepting and engaging with their child’s emotions, the healthier and more pro-social children’s emotional behaviors were.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Minimizing, ignoring, or punishing expressions of negative emotions backfire and may lead to emotional behaviors that are socially problematic. The best strategies for raising emotional vibrant and healthy kids is to acknowledge their emotions, help them label what they’re feeling, and help them problem solve to get to the root of their big emotions.

To dig deeper, check out our articles on emotional processing, emotional disconnection, and self-reparenting.

Original article:
Meyer S, Raikes HA, Virmani EA, Waters S, Thompson RA. Parent emotion representations and the socialization of emotion regulation in the family. International Journal of Behavioral Development. 2014;38(2):164-173. doi:10.1177/0165025413519014

What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study which means researchers didn’t change anything in the lives of the participants, but rather just asked them questions on different surveys and then used statistical methods to analyze the strength of associations between the answers.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how parents’ beliefs around emotions were related to their kindergarten-age kids’ ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers actually do?

They gave a bunch of surveys to 73 parents with kindergarten-age kids. The surveys asked about parents’ beliefs around emotions (for example, how important emotions are in life; whether they should be ignored or validated; which emotions are ok to express, etc.) and about how their kids typically respond to emotionally triggering events, like when another child takes away their toy. The researchers then used statistical methods to analyze how strongly associated parent beliefs were to children’s ability to express their emotions in healthy and pro-social ways.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the more strongly parents believed in accepting and engaging with their child’s emotions, the healthier and more pro-social children’s emotional behaviors were.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Minimizing, ignoring, or punishing expressions of negative emotions backfire and may lead to emotional behaviors that are socially problematic. The best strategies for raising emotional vibrant and healthy kids is to acknowledge their emotions, help them label what they’re feeling, and help them problem solve to get to the root of their big emotions.

To dig deeper, check out our articles on emotional processing, emotional disconnection, and self-reparenting.

Original article:
Meyer S, Raikes HA, Virmani EA, Waters S, Thompson RA. Parent emotion representations and the socialization of emotion regulation in the family. International Journal of Behavioral Development. 2014;38(2):164-173. doi:10.1177/0165025413519014

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