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New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

What kind of study was this?

This was a secondary analysis of a longitudinal data set, which means the researchers looked at responses people gave to surveys over multiple years and used statistical methods to look for new connections in the data.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if different aspects of parenting (level of involvement, amount of structure imposed on the child, amount of cultural stimulation, and intensity of parent goals) affected child personality type (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience).

What did the researchers actually do?

They took answers from surveys given once a year over four years to students in Germany and used statistical methods to look for connections between different aspects of parenting and child personality.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the aspects of parenting that were measured had very weak or no connection to children’s personalities.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Most parents have a gut feeling that their kids came into this world with their own personality and we’re just here to nurture it and let it bloom. This study provides evidence for this point of view.

If your child is introverted or extroverted, conscientious or carefree, open to new experiences or nervous in new environments, it might be just the way they are 🤷🏽‍♂️

Original article:
Mona Ayoub, Bo Zhang, Richard Göllner, Olivia E. Atherton, Ulrich Trautwein, Brent W. Roberts; Longitudinal Associations Between Parenting and Child Big Five Personality Traits. Collabra: Psychology 4 January 2021; 7 (1): 29766. doi:
https://doi.org/10.1525/collabra.29766

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

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New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

Curious how your parenting style may affect your kids' personalities? Research suggests that it might not at all.

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Key takeaways

1

Do aspects of parenting affect our kids’ personality types?

2

Researchers examined the answers to thousands of questionnaires given to students over four years to see if there were any statistical connections between parenting and child personality

3

They found little to no connection between parenting and child personality type

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Reading time:

3 minutes

What kind of study was this?

This was a secondary analysis of a longitudinal data set, which means the researchers looked at responses people gave to surveys over multiple years and used statistical methods to look for new connections in the data.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if different aspects of parenting (level of involvement, amount of structure imposed on the child, amount of cultural stimulation, and intensity of parent goals) affected child personality type (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience).

What did the researchers actually do?

They took answers from surveys given once a year over four years to students in Germany and used statistical methods to look for connections between different aspects of parenting and child personality.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the aspects of parenting that were measured had very weak or no connection to children’s personalities.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Most parents have a gut feeling that their kids came into this world with their own personality and we’re just here to nurture it and let it bloom. This study provides evidence for this point of view.

If your child is introverted or extroverted, conscientious or carefree, open to new experiences or nervous in new environments, it might be just the way they are 🤷🏽‍♂️

Original article:
Mona Ayoub, Bo Zhang, Richard Göllner, Olivia E. Atherton, Ulrich Trautwein, Brent W. Roberts; Longitudinal Associations Between Parenting and Child Big Five Personality Traits. Collabra: Psychology 4 January 2021; 7 (1): 29766. doi:
https://doi.org/10.1525/collabra.29766

What kind of study was this?

This was a secondary analysis of a longitudinal data set, which means the researchers looked at responses people gave to surveys over multiple years and used statistical methods to look for new connections in the data.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if different aspects of parenting (level of involvement, amount of structure imposed on the child, amount of cultural stimulation, and intensity of parent goals) affected child personality type (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience).

What did the researchers actually do?

They took answers from surveys given once a year over four years to students in Germany and used statistical methods to look for connections between different aspects of parenting and child personality.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the aspects of parenting that were measured had very weak or no connection to children’s personalities.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Most parents have a gut feeling that their kids came into this world with their own personality and we’re just here to nurture it and let it bloom. This study provides evidence for this point of view.

If your child is introverted or extroverted, conscientious or carefree, open to new experiences or nervous in new environments, it might be just the way they are 🤷🏽‍♂️

Original article:
Mona Ayoub, Bo Zhang, Richard Göllner, Olivia E. Atherton, Ulrich Trautwein, Brent W. Roberts; Longitudinal Associations Between Parenting and Child Big Five Personality Traits. Collabra: Psychology 4 January 2021; 7 (1): 29766. doi:
https://doi.org/10.1525/collabra.29766

What kind of study was this?

This was a secondary analysis of a longitudinal data set, which means the researchers looked at responses people gave to surveys over multiple years and used statistical methods to look for new connections in the data.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if different aspects of parenting (level of involvement, amount of structure imposed on the child, amount of cultural stimulation, and intensity of parent goals) affected child personality type (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience).

What did the researchers actually do?

They took answers from surveys given once a year over four years to students in Germany and used statistical methods to look for connections between different aspects of parenting and child personality.

What did the researchers find?

They found that the aspects of parenting that were measured had very weak or no connection to children’s personalities.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Most parents have a gut feeling that their kids came into this world with their own personality and we’re just here to nurture it and let it bloom. This study provides evidence for this point of view.

If your child is introverted or extroverted, conscientious or carefree, open to new experiences or nervous in new environments, it might be just the way they are 🤷🏽‍♂️

Original article:
Mona Ayoub, Bo Zhang, Richard Göllner, Olivia E. Atherton, Ulrich Trautwein, Brent W. Roberts; Longitudinal Associations Between Parenting and Child Big Five Personality Traits. Collabra: Psychology 4 January 2021; 7 (1): 29766. doi:
https://doi.org/10.1525/collabra.29766

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