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New Research: Science Has Found the Fastest Way for Parents to Do Strength Training

What kind of study was this?

This was a narrative review which means that researchers summarized specific fields of scientific research to build an overview on a broader topic. This is different than a systematic review, which more narrowly examines research on a specific topic and determines ahead of time exactly what kinds of studies, populations, methodologies, and outcomes will be included in the review, and which will be excluded.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how few strength-training exercises you could do and still get important health benefits.    

What did the researchers actually do?

They reviewed the exercise expert recommendations and science literature on how often people need to exercise (training frequency) and how much they need to exercise at a time (volume), how many repetitions of an exercise people should do, and what types of exercises people should do.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when it comes to strength exercise, how much you exercise is more important than how frequently you exercise. The three most time-effective exercises you can do without weights or going to the gym are push-ups, pull-ups, and squats.

They recommend doing at least four sets per exercise (a set is repeating an exercise movement a certain number of times in a row) and doing each set until you’re too tired to do another repetition of the movement. They call this “volitional failure.”

Here’s their basic recommendation broken down by our TFT Expert Team:

What does this mean for parents and kids?

You and your kids don’t need a ton of exercise to get really important benefits. Just four sets of push-ups, pull-ups, and squats PER WEEK will make you and your family stronger and healthier. The researchers only looked at research for adults, but because their final recommendations are simple, easy, and safe, they could be applied to adolescents as well.

Original article:
Iversen, V.M., Norum, M., Schoenfeld, B.J. et al. No Time to Lift? Designing Time-Efficient Training Programs for Strength and Hypertrophy: A Narrative Review. Sports Med (2021).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-021-01490-1

New Research: Science Has Found the Fastest Way for Parents to Do Strength Training

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New Research: Science Has Found the Fastest Way for Parents to Do Strength Training

You and your kids don’t need a ton of exercise to get really important benefits. Just four sets of push-ups, pull-ups, and squats PER WEEK will make you and your family stronger and healthier!

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What kind of study was this?

This was a narrative review which means that researchers summarized specific fields of scientific research to build an overview on a broader topic. This is different than a systematic review, which more narrowly examines research on a specific topic and determines ahead of time exactly what kinds of studies, populations, methodologies, and outcomes will be included in the review, and which will be excluded.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how few strength-training exercises you could do and still get important health benefits.    

What did the researchers actually do?

They reviewed the exercise expert recommendations and science literature on how often people need to exercise (training frequency) and how much they need to exercise at a time (volume), how many repetitions of an exercise people should do, and what types of exercises people should do.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when it comes to strength exercise, how much you exercise is more important than how frequently you exercise. The three most time-effective exercises you can do without weights or going to the gym are push-ups, pull-ups, and squats.

They recommend doing at least four sets per exercise (a set is repeating an exercise movement a certain number of times in a row) and doing each set until you’re too tired to do another repetition of the movement. They call this “volitional failure.”

Here’s their basic recommendation broken down by our TFT Expert Team:

What does this mean for parents and kids?

You and your kids don’t need a ton of exercise to get really important benefits. Just four sets of push-ups, pull-ups, and squats PER WEEK will make you and your family stronger and healthier. The researchers only looked at research for adults, but because their final recommendations are simple, easy, and safe, they could be applied to adolescents as well.

Original article:
Iversen, V.M., Norum, M., Schoenfeld, B.J. et al. No Time to Lift? Designing Time-Efficient Training Programs for Strength and Hypertrophy: A Narrative Review. Sports Med (2021).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-021-01490-1

What kind of study was this?

This was a narrative review which means that researchers summarized specific fields of scientific research to build an overview on a broader topic. This is different than a systematic review, which more narrowly examines research on a specific topic and determines ahead of time exactly what kinds of studies, populations, methodologies, and outcomes will be included in the review, and which will be excluded.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how few strength-training exercises you could do and still get important health benefits.    

What did the researchers actually do?

They reviewed the exercise expert recommendations and science literature on how often people need to exercise (training frequency) and how much they need to exercise at a time (volume), how many repetitions of an exercise people should do, and what types of exercises people should do.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when it comes to strength exercise, how much you exercise is more important than how frequently you exercise. The three most time-effective exercises you can do without weights or going to the gym are push-ups, pull-ups, and squats.

They recommend doing at least four sets per exercise (a set is repeating an exercise movement a certain number of times in a row) and doing each set until you’re too tired to do another repetition of the movement. They call this “volitional failure.”

Here’s their basic recommendation broken down by our TFT Expert Team:

What does this mean for parents and kids?

You and your kids don’t need a ton of exercise to get really important benefits. Just four sets of push-ups, pull-ups, and squats PER WEEK will make you and your family stronger and healthier. The researchers only looked at research for adults, but because their final recommendations are simple, easy, and safe, they could be applied to adolescents as well.

Original article:
Iversen, V.M., Norum, M., Schoenfeld, B.J. et al. No Time to Lift? Designing Time-Efficient Training Programs for Strength and Hypertrophy: A Narrative Review. Sports Med (2021).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-021-01490-1

What kind of study was this?

This was a narrative review which means that researchers summarized specific fields of scientific research to build an overview on a broader topic. This is different than a systematic review, which more narrowly examines research on a specific topic and determines ahead of time exactly what kinds of studies, populations, methodologies, and outcomes will be included in the review, and which will be excluded.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how few strength-training exercises you could do and still get important health benefits.    

What did the researchers actually do?

They reviewed the exercise expert recommendations and science literature on how often people need to exercise (training frequency) and how much they need to exercise at a time (volume), how many repetitions of an exercise people should do, and what types of exercises people should do.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when it comes to strength exercise, how much you exercise is more important than how frequently you exercise. The three most time-effective exercises you can do without weights or going to the gym are push-ups, pull-ups, and squats.

They recommend doing at least four sets per exercise (a set is repeating an exercise movement a certain number of times in a row) and doing each set until you’re too tired to do another repetition of the movement. They call this “volitional failure.”

Here’s their basic recommendation broken down by our TFT Expert Team:

What does this mean for parents and kids?

You and your kids don’t need a ton of exercise to get really important benefits. Just four sets of push-ups, pull-ups, and squats PER WEEK will make you and your family stronger and healthier. The researchers only looked at research for adults, but because their final recommendations are simple, easy, and safe, they could be applied to adolescents as well.

Original article:
Iversen, V.M., Norum, M., Schoenfeld, B.J. et al. No Time to Lift? Designing Time-Efficient Training Programs for Strength and Hypertrophy: A Narrative Review. Sports Med (2021).
https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-021-01490-1

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