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New Research: Feeling Powerful in Your Relationship Is Tied to Marriage Satisfaction

What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study, which means that researchers gave couples questionnaires to ask them about different aspects of their lives. The researchers didn’t change, manipulate, or run any experiments. After collecting the questionnaire responses, the researchers used fancy statistical techniques to analyze how questionnaire responses by each member of a couple were associated with each other.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how a subjective sense of power and objective measures of power were connected to relationship satisfaction in married couples.

What did the researchers actually do?

The researchers gave 181 couples a questionnaire that asked about their subjective sense of power (with questions like: “How satisfied are you with the extent to which you influence decisions in your relationship?”) and objective measures of power (with questions about who in the marriage made more money).

What did the researchers find?

The researchers found that relationship satisfaction was not tied to objective measures of power but rather to a subjective sense of power.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Married parents are more likely to be satisfied with their relationship if both partners feel a strong sense of empowerment. This feeling of empowerment isn’t tied to who earns more money but is tied to things like shared decision-making and healthy communication habits.

Original article:
Körner R, Schütz A. Power in romantic relationships: How positional and experienced power are associated with relationship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 2021;38(9):2653-2677. doi:10.1177/02654075211017670

New Research: Feeling Powerful in Your Relationship Is Tied to Marriage Satisfaction

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New Research: Feeling Powerful in Your Relationship Is Tied to Marriage Satisfaction

A subjective sense of power is more important to relationship satisfaction than objective measures of financial power.

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What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study, which means that researchers gave couples questionnaires to ask them about different aspects of their lives. The researchers didn’t change, manipulate, or run any experiments. After collecting the questionnaire responses, the researchers used fancy statistical techniques to analyze how questionnaire responses by each member of a couple were associated with each other.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how a subjective sense of power and objective measures of power were connected to relationship satisfaction in married couples.

What did the researchers actually do?

The researchers gave 181 couples a questionnaire that asked about their subjective sense of power (with questions like: “How satisfied are you with the extent to which you influence decisions in your relationship?”) and objective measures of power (with questions about who in the marriage made more money).

What did the researchers find?

The researchers found that relationship satisfaction was not tied to objective measures of power but rather to a subjective sense of power.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Married parents are more likely to be satisfied with their relationship if both partners feel a strong sense of empowerment. This feeling of empowerment isn’t tied to who earns more money but is tied to things like shared decision-making and healthy communication habits.

Original article:
Körner R, Schütz A. Power in romantic relationships: How positional and experienced power are associated with relationship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 2021;38(9):2653-2677. doi:10.1177/02654075211017670

What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study, which means that researchers gave couples questionnaires to ask them about different aspects of their lives. The researchers didn’t change, manipulate, or run any experiments. After collecting the questionnaire responses, the researchers used fancy statistical techniques to analyze how questionnaire responses by each member of a couple were associated with each other.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how a subjective sense of power and objective measures of power were connected to relationship satisfaction in married couples.

What did the researchers actually do?

The researchers gave 181 couples a questionnaire that asked about their subjective sense of power (with questions like: “How satisfied are you with the extent to which you influence decisions in your relationship?”) and objective measures of power (with questions about who in the marriage made more money).

What did the researchers find?

The researchers found that relationship satisfaction was not tied to objective measures of power but rather to a subjective sense of power.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Married parents are more likely to be satisfied with their relationship if both partners feel a strong sense of empowerment. This feeling of empowerment isn’t tied to who earns more money but is tied to things like shared decision-making and healthy communication habits.

Original article:
Körner R, Schütz A. Power in romantic relationships: How positional and experienced power are associated with relationship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 2021;38(9):2653-2677. doi:10.1177/02654075211017670

What kind of study was this?

This was an observational study, which means that researchers gave couples questionnaires to ask them about different aspects of their lives. The researchers didn’t change, manipulate, or run any experiments. After collecting the questionnaire responses, the researchers used fancy statistical techniques to analyze how questionnaire responses by each member of a couple were associated with each other.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know how a subjective sense of power and objective measures of power were connected to relationship satisfaction in married couples.

What did the researchers actually do?

The researchers gave 181 couples a questionnaire that asked about their subjective sense of power (with questions like: “How satisfied are you with the extent to which you influence decisions in your relationship?”) and objective measures of power (with questions about who in the marriage made more money).

What did the researchers find?

The researchers found that relationship satisfaction was not tied to objective measures of power but rather to a subjective sense of power.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Married parents are more likely to be satisfied with their relationship if both partners feel a strong sense of empowerment. This feeling of empowerment isn’t tied to who earns more money but is tied to things like shared decision-making and healthy communication habits.

Original article:
Körner R, Schütz A. Power in romantic relationships: How positional and experienced power are associated with relationship quality. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 2021;38(9):2653-2677. doi:10.1177/02654075211017670

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