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New Research: Eggs Are Better Than Cereal

What kind of study was this?

This was a dietary randomized cross-over study, which means that researchers randomly assigned participants to different diets, measured specific outcomes after participants ate those diets, and then switched the groups at a later date to eat the other diet. Researchers do this to see if all the participants will respond similarly to both diets.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if a high-protein breakfast will reduce hunger and the amount people eat later in the day over a high-carbohydrate breakfast.  

What did the researchers actually do?

They took 44 overweight participants and randomly assigned them to eat one of two breakfasts that were equal in calories: eggs and toast versus cereal, milk, and juice. Then they were allowed to eat whatever they wanted at lunch but their hunger levels and food consumption were closely measured.

The participants were invited back one week later, their breakfasts were switched (the first eggs group ate cereal this time and vice versa), and their food consumption and hunger were tracked through lunch.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when participants had eggs and toast for breakfast, they experienced less hunger and spontaneously ate fewer calories for lunch.

When the participants had cereal and juice for breakfast—even though it was the same amount of calories as the eggs and toast—they were hungrier earlier and spontaneously ate almost 200 more calories at lunch.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Breakfast is indeed the most important meal of the day. If it’s full of protein and light on starchy carbs and sugar then you and your kids will be set up to spontaneously eat a healthy amount later in the day.

Written by the Yes Collective Expert Team

Original article:
B Keogh J, M Clifton P. Energy Intake and Satiety Responses of Eggs for Breakfast in Overweight and Obese Adults—A Crossover Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(15):5583.
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155583

New Research: Eggs Are Better Than Cereal

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New Research: Eggs Are Better Than Cereal

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day but what’s in that breakfast makes a huge difference. Feeding your family a high-protein breakfast will set them up to spontaneously eat a healthy amount later in the day

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Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

Fierce Food: Balance

Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

Fierce Food: Power

Fierce Food: Power

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Reading time:

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What kind of study was this?

This was a dietary randomized cross-over study, which means that researchers randomly assigned participants to different diets, measured specific outcomes after participants ate those diets, and then switched the groups at a later date to eat the other diet. Researchers do this to see if all the participants will respond similarly to both diets.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if a high-protein breakfast will reduce hunger and the amount people eat later in the day over a high-carbohydrate breakfast.  

What did the researchers actually do?

They took 44 overweight participants and randomly assigned them to eat one of two breakfasts that were equal in calories: eggs and toast versus cereal, milk, and juice. Then they were allowed to eat whatever they wanted at lunch but their hunger levels and food consumption were closely measured.

The participants were invited back one week later, their breakfasts were switched (the first eggs group ate cereal this time and vice versa), and their food consumption and hunger were tracked through lunch.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when participants had eggs and toast for breakfast, they experienced less hunger and spontaneously ate fewer calories for lunch.

When the participants had cereal and juice for breakfast—even though it was the same amount of calories as the eggs and toast—they were hungrier earlier and spontaneously ate almost 200 more calories at lunch.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Breakfast is indeed the most important meal of the day. If it’s full of protein and light on starchy carbs and sugar then you and your kids will be set up to spontaneously eat a healthy amount later in the day.

Written by the Yes Collective Expert Team

Original article:
B Keogh J, M Clifton P. Energy Intake and Satiety Responses of Eggs for Breakfast in Overweight and Obese Adults—A Crossover Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(15):5583.
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155583

What kind of study was this?

This was a dietary randomized cross-over study, which means that researchers randomly assigned participants to different diets, measured specific outcomes after participants ate those diets, and then switched the groups at a later date to eat the other diet. Researchers do this to see if all the participants will respond similarly to both diets.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if a high-protein breakfast will reduce hunger and the amount people eat later in the day over a high-carbohydrate breakfast.  

What did the researchers actually do?

They took 44 overweight participants and randomly assigned them to eat one of two breakfasts that were equal in calories: eggs and toast versus cereal, milk, and juice. Then they were allowed to eat whatever they wanted at lunch but their hunger levels and food consumption were closely measured.

The participants were invited back one week later, their breakfasts were switched (the first eggs group ate cereal this time and vice versa), and their food consumption and hunger were tracked through lunch.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when participants had eggs and toast for breakfast, they experienced less hunger and spontaneously ate fewer calories for lunch.

When the participants had cereal and juice for breakfast—even though it was the same amount of calories as the eggs and toast—they were hungrier earlier and spontaneously ate almost 200 more calories at lunch.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Breakfast is indeed the most important meal of the day. If it’s full of protein and light on starchy carbs and sugar then you and your kids will be set up to spontaneously eat a healthy amount later in the day.

Written by the Yes Collective Expert Team

Original article:
B Keogh J, M Clifton P. Energy Intake and Satiety Responses of Eggs for Breakfast in Overweight and Obese Adults—A Crossover Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(15):5583.
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155583

What kind of study was this?

This was a dietary randomized cross-over study, which means that researchers randomly assigned participants to different diets, measured specific outcomes after participants ate those diets, and then switched the groups at a later date to eat the other diet. Researchers do this to see if all the participants will respond similarly to both diets.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if a high-protein breakfast will reduce hunger and the amount people eat later in the day over a high-carbohydrate breakfast.  

What did the researchers actually do?

They took 44 overweight participants and randomly assigned them to eat one of two breakfasts that were equal in calories: eggs and toast versus cereal, milk, and juice. Then they were allowed to eat whatever they wanted at lunch but their hunger levels and food consumption were closely measured.

The participants were invited back one week later, their breakfasts were switched (the first eggs group ate cereal this time and vice versa), and their food consumption and hunger were tracked through lunch.

What did the researchers find?

They found that when participants had eggs and toast for breakfast, they experienced less hunger and spontaneously ate fewer calories for lunch.

When the participants had cereal and juice for breakfast—even though it was the same amount of calories as the eggs and toast—they were hungrier earlier and spontaneously ate almost 200 more calories at lunch.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Breakfast is indeed the most important meal of the day. If it’s full of protein and light on starchy carbs and sugar then you and your kids will be set up to spontaneously eat a healthy amount later in the day.

Written by the Yes Collective Expert Team

Original article:
B Keogh J, M Clifton P. Energy Intake and Satiety Responses of Eggs for Breakfast in Overweight and Obese Adults—A Crossover Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(15):5583.
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155583

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