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New Research: Being married reduces your risk for heart disease, stroke, and early death

What kind of study was this?

This was a meta-analysis, which is a study that looks at all the research that has been conducted on a particular topic (using specific criteria to decide which studies get included and which don’t).

The researchers in this study only looked at observational research, which is where researchers only measure variables, they don’t manipulate them (as in an experiment). In observational research, the measured variables are statistically analyzed to look for associations.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if there was a significant association in all the existing research between being married and heart disease, stroke, and related death.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched academic research databases for all the research studies that met their predetermined criteria (observational studies that examined marital status, and outcomes associated with heart disease, stroke, and related death).

What did the researchers find?

When they combined all the data from all the studies, they found that unmarried people had a 42% higher risk for cardiovascular disease, 43% higher risk for dying from coronary heart disease, and 55% higher risk for dying from a stroke than unmarried people. Those who are divorced had a 33% higher risk for all these cardiovascular outcomes than those who are married.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

A lot of other research suggests there are important health benefits to being married. Here’s another strong piece of evidence to back that up.  

Original article: Wong CW, Kwok CS, Narain A, et al. Marital status and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Heart 2018;104:1937-1948.

New Research: Being married reduces your risk for heart disease, stroke, and early death

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New Research: Being married reduces your risk for heart disease, stroke, and early death

Large observational studies consistently show that married people have a lower risk for experiencing heart disease, stroke, and early death than those who are unmarried or divorced.

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What kind of study was this?

This was a meta-analysis, which is a study that looks at all the research that has been conducted on a particular topic (using specific criteria to decide which studies get included and which don’t).

The researchers in this study only looked at observational research, which is where researchers only measure variables, they don’t manipulate them (as in an experiment). In observational research, the measured variables are statistically analyzed to look for associations.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if there was a significant association in all the existing research between being married and heart disease, stroke, and related death.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched academic research databases for all the research studies that met their predetermined criteria (observational studies that examined marital status, and outcomes associated with heart disease, stroke, and related death).

What did the researchers find?

When they combined all the data from all the studies, they found that unmarried people had a 42% higher risk for cardiovascular disease, 43% higher risk for dying from coronary heart disease, and 55% higher risk for dying from a stroke than unmarried people. Those who are divorced had a 33% higher risk for all these cardiovascular outcomes than those who are married.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

A lot of other research suggests there are important health benefits to being married. Here’s another strong piece of evidence to back that up.  

Original article: Wong CW, Kwok CS, Narain A, et al. Marital status and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Heart 2018;104:1937-1948.

What kind of study was this?

This was a meta-analysis, which is a study that looks at all the research that has been conducted on a particular topic (using specific criteria to decide which studies get included and which don’t).

The researchers in this study only looked at observational research, which is where researchers only measure variables, they don’t manipulate them (as in an experiment). In observational research, the measured variables are statistically analyzed to look for associations.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if there was a significant association in all the existing research between being married and heart disease, stroke, and related death.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched academic research databases for all the research studies that met their predetermined criteria (observational studies that examined marital status, and outcomes associated with heart disease, stroke, and related death).

What did the researchers find?

When they combined all the data from all the studies, they found that unmarried people had a 42% higher risk for cardiovascular disease, 43% higher risk for dying from coronary heart disease, and 55% higher risk for dying from a stroke than unmarried people. Those who are divorced had a 33% higher risk for all these cardiovascular outcomes than those who are married.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

A lot of other research suggests there are important health benefits to being married. Here’s another strong piece of evidence to back that up.  

Original article: Wong CW, Kwok CS, Narain A, et al. Marital status and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Heart 2018;104:1937-1948.

What kind of study was this?

This was a meta-analysis, which is a study that looks at all the research that has been conducted on a particular topic (using specific criteria to decide which studies get included and which don’t).

The researchers in this study only looked at observational research, which is where researchers only measure variables, they don’t manipulate them (as in an experiment). In observational research, the measured variables are statistically analyzed to look for associations.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know if there was a significant association in all the existing research between being married and heart disease, stroke, and related death.

What did the researchers actually do?

They searched academic research databases for all the research studies that met their predetermined criteria (observational studies that examined marital status, and outcomes associated with heart disease, stroke, and related death).

What did the researchers find?

When they combined all the data from all the studies, they found that unmarried people had a 42% higher risk for cardiovascular disease, 43% higher risk for dying from coronary heart disease, and 55% higher risk for dying from a stroke than unmarried people. Those who are divorced had a 33% higher risk for all these cardiovascular outcomes than those who are married.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

A lot of other research suggests there are important health benefits to being married. Here’s another strong piece of evidence to back that up.  

Original article: Wong CW, Kwok CS, Narain A, et al. Marital status and risk of cardiovascular diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Heart 2018;104:1937-1948.

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