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Meet the Yes Collective Experts: Colin Champ, MD

Colin Champ, MD is a father, husband, researcher, and Board-Certified Radiation Oncologist at Duke University in Durham, NC. As a physician, Colin believes in seeing the patient comprehensively, as a person, rather than just their diagnosis.

Colin is also the Chair of Yes Collective’s Scientific Advisory Board. Here's what he has to share about parenting, thriving, and living your best life.

Reading time: 4 minutes

What does family mean to you?

My family is an extension of me as we are one large team working together to be the best people we can.

What does thriving mean to you?

Thriving is giving it my all. At the end of the day, only I know if I am giving my work and those around me my everything. When I am thriving, I know I am accomplishing this and it will be rewarding in the long term.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An architect!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

During my college years, I wrote diets and workouts for friends and family members. At that point, whether it was through work as a doctor or biomedical engineer, I realized how incredible it was to help people to be healthier and feel better. Nothing can compare to this feeling, and to do this for a living is pure joy.

What do you find to be the most meaningful part of your medical or research practice?

Research is rewarding, but nothing compares to actually impacting people over the long term. When I see my work leaving a positive imprint on someone, little can compare to what a great feeling that is. I have had people contact me years after meeting to tell me what a difference these changes made over the long term—this is the most meaningful part of my work.

How do your training and work influence your approach to parenting?

Tough love. Being healthy and happy takes time and dedication and lots of work. Raising a child is the same. It is not easy to be tough at times, but I know it will pay off in the long term. I know that teaching them important lessons in life takes much more time and effort on my end than simply being their best friend, but they will be a better person for it.

What do you see as the biggest factors in parents leading mentally and emotionally thriving lives?

Staying active, having hobbies, nourishing our minds and bodies through healthy behaviors, and ignoring social media and new sources that idolize short term reward and negative behaviors that stand in the way of raising our children right. Age-old traditions are helpful as well—they have been altered over thousands of years of trial and error and many were passed down through our families as they knew the importance of these lessons both for our children and us. Our grandparents were smarter than we often give them credit for.

As a dad and as a physician and researcher, what is one piece of parenting advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put down the devices around your kids! As addictive as they are for adults, it is even worse for our children. We need to teach them to be happy with life around them, which includes moments of silence and not always needing entertainment!

What is one piece of self-care advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put on your mask first. We need to be thriving to our fullest to take care of our families. Cutting corners will affect this care. I always get a full night of sleep, exercise, and eat nourishing meals, regardless of what’s going on. My body requires it and my family requires it for me to be my best.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

I always wake up, read, and take some time in the morning before I start the day. I keep my phone off and don't connect with the world for a couple of hours. That is my time and it helps me approach each day feeling thankful and recharged.

What lies ahead for Colin Champ?

More research, writing, and hoping to positively impact people while loving every second of life with my beautiful wife Juli, and beautiful daughter Aurelia (and beautiful dog Mooshu).

Meet the Yes Collective Experts: Colin Champ, MD

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5 Minutes

Colin Champ, MD is a father, husband, researcher, and Board-Certified Radiation Oncologist at Duke University in Durham, NC. As a physician, Colin believes in seeing the patient comprehensively, as a person, rather than just their diagnosis.

Colin is also the Chair of Yes Collective’s Scientific Advisory Board. Here's what he has to share about parenting, thriving, and living your best life.

Reading time: 4 minutes

What does family mean to you?

My family is an extension of me as we are one large team working together to be the best people we can.

What does thriving mean to you?

Thriving is giving it my all. At the end of the day, only I know if I am giving my work and those around me my everything. When I am thriving, I know I am accomplishing this and it will be rewarding in the long term.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An architect!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

During my college years, I wrote diets and workouts for friends and family members. At that point, whether it was through work as a doctor or biomedical engineer, I realized how incredible it was to help people to be healthier and feel better. Nothing can compare to this feeling, and to do this for a living is pure joy.

What do you find to be the most meaningful part of your medical or research practice?

Research is rewarding, but nothing compares to actually impacting people over the long term. When I see my work leaving a positive imprint on someone, little can compare to what a great feeling that is. I have had people contact me years after meeting to tell me what a difference these changes made over the long term—this is the most meaningful part of my work.

How do your training and work influence your approach to parenting?

Tough love. Being healthy and happy takes time and dedication and lots of work. Raising a child is the same. It is not easy to be tough at times, but I know it will pay off in the long term. I know that teaching them important lessons in life takes much more time and effort on my end than simply being their best friend, but they will be a better person for it.

What do you see as the biggest factors in parents leading mentally and emotionally thriving lives?

Staying active, having hobbies, nourishing our minds and bodies through healthy behaviors, and ignoring social media and new sources that idolize short term reward and negative behaviors that stand in the way of raising our children right. Age-old traditions are helpful as well—they have been altered over thousands of years of trial and error and many were passed down through our families as they knew the importance of these lessons both for our children and us. Our grandparents were smarter than we often give them credit for.

As a dad and as a physician and researcher, what is one piece of parenting advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put down the devices around your kids! As addictive as they are for adults, it is even worse for our children. We need to teach them to be happy with life around them, which includes moments of silence and not always needing entertainment!

What is one piece of self-care advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put on your mask first. We need to be thriving to our fullest to take care of our families. Cutting corners will affect this care. I always get a full night of sleep, exercise, and eat nourishing meals, regardless of what’s going on. My body requires it and my family requires it for me to be my best.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

I always wake up, read, and take some time in the morning before I start the day. I keep my phone off and don't connect with the world for a couple of hours. That is my time and it helps me approach each day feeling thankful and recharged.

What lies ahead for Colin Champ?

More research, writing, and hoping to positively impact people while loving every second of life with my beautiful wife Juli, and beautiful daughter Aurelia (and beautiful dog Mooshu).

Colin Champ, MD is a father, husband, researcher, and Board-Certified Radiation Oncologist at Duke University in Durham, NC. As a physician, Colin believes in seeing the patient comprehensively, as a person, rather than just their diagnosis.

Colin is also the Chair of Yes Collective’s Scientific Advisory Board. Here's what he has to share about parenting, thriving, and living your best life.

Reading time: 4 minutes

What does family mean to you?

My family is an extension of me as we are one large team working together to be the best people we can.

What does thriving mean to you?

Thriving is giving it my all. At the end of the day, only I know if I am giving my work and those around me my everything. When I am thriving, I know I am accomplishing this and it will be rewarding in the long term.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An architect!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

During my college years, I wrote diets and workouts for friends and family members. At that point, whether it was through work as a doctor or biomedical engineer, I realized how incredible it was to help people to be healthier and feel better. Nothing can compare to this feeling, and to do this for a living is pure joy.

What do you find to be the most meaningful part of your medical or research practice?

Research is rewarding, but nothing compares to actually impacting people over the long term. When I see my work leaving a positive imprint on someone, little can compare to what a great feeling that is. I have had people contact me years after meeting to tell me what a difference these changes made over the long term—this is the most meaningful part of my work.

How do your training and work influence your approach to parenting?

Tough love. Being healthy and happy takes time and dedication and lots of work. Raising a child is the same. It is not easy to be tough at times, but I know it will pay off in the long term. I know that teaching them important lessons in life takes much more time and effort on my end than simply being their best friend, but they will be a better person for it.

What do you see as the biggest factors in parents leading mentally and emotionally thriving lives?

Staying active, having hobbies, nourishing our minds and bodies through healthy behaviors, and ignoring social media and new sources that idolize short term reward and negative behaviors that stand in the way of raising our children right. Age-old traditions are helpful as well—they have been altered over thousands of years of trial and error and many were passed down through our families as they knew the importance of these lessons both for our children and us. Our grandparents were smarter than we often give them credit for.

As a dad and as a physician and researcher, what is one piece of parenting advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put down the devices around your kids! As addictive as they are for adults, it is even worse for our children. We need to teach them to be happy with life around them, which includes moments of silence and not always needing entertainment!

What is one piece of self-care advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put on your mask first. We need to be thriving to our fullest to take care of our families. Cutting corners will affect this care. I always get a full night of sleep, exercise, and eat nourishing meals, regardless of what’s going on. My body requires it and my family requires it for me to be my best.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

I always wake up, read, and take some time in the morning before I start the day. I keep my phone off and don't connect with the world for a couple of hours. That is my time and it helps me approach each day feeling thankful and recharged.

What lies ahead for Colin Champ?

More research, writing, and hoping to positively impact people while loving every second of life with my beautiful wife Juli, and beautiful daughter Aurelia (and beautiful dog Mooshu).

Colin Champ, MD is a father, husband, researcher, and Board-Certified Radiation Oncologist at Duke University in Durham, NC. As a physician, Colin believes in seeing the patient comprehensively, as a person, rather than just their diagnosis.

Colin is also the Chair of Yes Collective’s Scientific Advisory Board. Here's what he has to share about parenting, thriving, and living your best life.

Reading time: 4 minutes

What does family mean to you?

My family is an extension of me as we are one large team working together to be the best people we can.

What does thriving mean to you?

Thriving is giving it my all. At the end of the day, only I know if I am giving my work and those around me my everything. When I am thriving, I know I am accomplishing this and it will be rewarding in the long term.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An architect!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

During my college years, I wrote diets and workouts for friends and family members. At that point, whether it was through work as a doctor or biomedical engineer, I realized how incredible it was to help people to be healthier and feel better. Nothing can compare to this feeling, and to do this for a living is pure joy.

What do you find to be the most meaningful part of your medical or research practice?

Research is rewarding, but nothing compares to actually impacting people over the long term. When I see my work leaving a positive imprint on someone, little can compare to what a great feeling that is. I have had people contact me years after meeting to tell me what a difference these changes made over the long term—this is the most meaningful part of my work.

How do your training and work influence your approach to parenting?

Tough love. Being healthy and happy takes time and dedication and lots of work. Raising a child is the same. It is not easy to be tough at times, but I know it will pay off in the long term. I know that teaching them important lessons in life takes much more time and effort on my end than simply being their best friend, but they will be a better person for it.

What do you see as the biggest factors in parents leading mentally and emotionally thriving lives?

Staying active, having hobbies, nourishing our minds and bodies through healthy behaviors, and ignoring social media and new sources that idolize short term reward and negative behaviors that stand in the way of raising our children right. Age-old traditions are helpful as well—they have been altered over thousands of years of trial and error and many were passed down through our families as they knew the importance of these lessons both for our children and us. Our grandparents were smarter than we often give them credit for.

As a dad and as a physician and researcher, what is one piece of parenting advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put down the devices around your kids! As addictive as they are for adults, it is even worse for our children. We need to teach them to be happy with life around them, which includes moments of silence and not always needing entertainment!

What is one piece of self-care advice you’d give to Yes Collective Parents?

Put on your mask first. We need to be thriving to our fullest to take care of our families. Cutting corners will affect this care. I always get a full night of sleep, exercise, and eat nourishing meals, regardless of what’s going on. My body requires it and my family requires it for me to be my best.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

I always wake up, read, and take some time in the morning before I start the day. I keep my phone off and don't connect with the world for a couple of hours. That is my time and it helps me approach each day feeling thankful and recharged.

What lies ahead for Colin Champ?

More research, writing, and hoping to positively impact people while loving every second of life with my beautiful wife Juli, and beautiful daughter Aurelia (and beautiful dog Mooshu).

Enjoying this article? Subscribe to the Yes Collective for more expert emotional wellness just for parents.

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