Directions

Ingredients

New Research: A Whole Food Diet Leads to Better Health Through Good Gut Bacteria


What kind of study was this?

This was a single-arm (meaning there was only one group in the study rather than different groups randomly assigned to different treatments) intervention (meaning the participants received some sort of treatment or underwent some change) research study.

Many nutrition studies are not interventions, but are rather observational, meaning the researchers only measure biological markers but don’t “intervene” by changing anything about the participants’ lives.

What did researchers want to know?

Scientists have known for a long time what the “average” metabolic responses (blood sugar, insulin, cholesterol, etc.) to most types of food are.

In this study, researchers wanted to know how personal characteristics (such as age, gender, genetics, gut bacteria, and general health influence) and meal context (such as time, sleep, and exercise) influence people’s metabolic response to different foods.

What did the researchers actually do?

They first measured a large range of participant biological markers from weight, fasting blood sugar, and cholesterol to genetics and gut bacteria patterns.

They also measured what people ate in their normal lives. Then they fed the participants carefully prepared and measured meals and then re-measured their metabolic responses.

What did the researchers find?

In this particular article, the researchers reported finding that participant’s gut bacteria patterns fell into two groups. One of the groups had a much healthier metabolic response to the intervention meals than the other.

The group with the healthier metabolic response ate more unprocessed, whole foods (animal protein included) and the group with the worse metabolic response ate more processed foods.

This suggests that a healthy gut bacteria pattern is one of the links between eating whole foods and good general health.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

When we focus our family meals on less processed, whole foods, we’re promoting a healthy metabolism (weight, blood sugar, cholesterol) through building a healthy gut bacteria pattern.

Original Article:

Asnicar, F., Berry, S.E., Valdes, A.M. et al. Microbiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1,098 deeply phenotyped individuals. Nature Medicine (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-01183-8

New Research: A Whole Food Diet Leads to Better Health Through Good Gut Bacteria

Close
Theme icon

Podcast /

Content /

Embody

New Research: A Whole Food Diet Leads to Better Health Through Good Gut Bacteria

Researchers found that a diet of unprocessed, whole foods (animal protein included) promoted gut bacteria linked to a healthy weight, good blood sugar control, and strong heart health

Join the Yes Collective and download the mobile app today

JOIN TODAY

Key takeaways

1

2

3

Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

Fierce Food: Balance

Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

Fierce Food: Power

Fierce Food: Power

Ingredients

Kitchen Equipment

Ingredient Replacement

View replacement list (PDF)

Reading time:

3 Minutes


What kind of study was this?

This was a single-arm (meaning there was only one group in the study rather than different groups randomly assigned to different treatments) intervention (meaning the participants received some sort of treatment or underwent some change) research study.

Many nutrition studies are not interventions, but are rather observational, meaning the researchers only measure biological markers but don’t “intervene” by changing anything about the participants’ lives.

What did researchers want to know?

Scientists have known for a long time what the “average” metabolic responses (blood sugar, insulin, cholesterol, etc.) to most types of food are.

In this study, researchers wanted to know how personal characteristics (such as age, gender, genetics, gut bacteria, and general health influence) and meal context (such as time, sleep, and exercise) influence people’s metabolic response to different foods.

What did the researchers actually do?

They first measured a large range of participant biological markers from weight, fasting blood sugar, and cholesterol to genetics and gut bacteria patterns.

They also measured what people ate in their normal lives. Then they fed the participants carefully prepared and measured meals and then re-measured their metabolic responses.

What did the researchers find?

In this particular article, the researchers reported finding that participant’s gut bacteria patterns fell into two groups. One of the groups had a much healthier metabolic response to the intervention meals than the other.

The group with the healthier metabolic response ate more unprocessed, whole foods (animal protein included) and the group with the worse metabolic response ate more processed foods.

This suggests that a healthy gut bacteria pattern is one of the links between eating whole foods and good general health.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

When we focus our family meals on less processed, whole foods, we’re promoting a healthy metabolism (weight, blood sugar, cholesterol) through building a healthy gut bacteria pattern.

Original Article:

Asnicar, F., Berry, S.E., Valdes, A.M. et al. Microbiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1,098 deeply phenotyped individuals. Nature Medicine (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-01183-8


What kind of study was this?

This was a single-arm (meaning there was only one group in the study rather than different groups randomly assigned to different treatments) intervention (meaning the participants received some sort of treatment or underwent some change) research study.

Many nutrition studies are not interventions, but are rather observational, meaning the researchers only measure biological markers but don’t “intervene” by changing anything about the participants’ lives.

What did researchers want to know?

Scientists have known for a long time what the “average” metabolic responses (blood sugar, insulin, cholesterol, etc.) to most types of food are.

In this study, researchers wanted to know how personal characteristics (such as age, gender, genetics, gut bacteria, and general health influence) and meal context (such as time, sleep, and exercise) influence people’s metabolic response to different foods.

What did the researchers actually do?

They first measured a large range of participant biological markers from weight, fasting blood sugar, and cholesterol to genetics and gut bacteria patterns.

They also measured what people ate in their normal lives. Then they fed the participants carefully prepared and measured meals and then re-measured their metabolic responses.

What did the researchers find?

In this particular article, the researchers reported finding that participant’s gut bacteria patterns fell into two groups. One of the groups had a much healthier metabolic response to the intervention meals than the other.

The group with the healthier metabolic response ate more unprocessed, whole foods (animal protein included) and the group with the worse metabolic response ate more processed foods.

This suggests that a healthy gut bacteria pattern is one of the links between eating whole foods and good general health.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

When we focus our family meals on less processed, whole foods, we’re promoting a healthy metabolism (weight, blood sugar, cholesterol) through building a healthy gut bacteria pattern.

Original Article:

Asnicar, F., Berry, S.E., Valdes, A.M. et al. Microbiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1,098 deeply phenotyped individuals. Nature Medicine (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-01183-8


What kind of study was this?

This was a single-arm (meaning there was only one group in the study rather than different groups randomly assigned to different treatments) intervention (meaning the participants received some sort of treatment or underwent some change) research study.

Many nutrition studies are not interventions, but are rather observational, meaning the researchers only measure biological markers but don’t “intervene” by changing anything about the participants’ lives.

What did researchers want to know?

Scientists have known for a long time what the “average” metabolic responses (blood sugar, insulin, cholesterol, etc.) to most types of food are.

In this study, researchers wanted to know how personal characteristics (such as age, gender, genetics, gut bacteria, and general health influence) and meal context (such as time, sleep, and exercise) influence people’s metabolic response to different foods.

What did the researchers actually do?

They first measured a large range of participant biological markers from weight, fasting blood sugar, and cholesterol to genetics and gut bacteria patterns.

They also measured what people ate in their normal lives. Then they fed the participants carefully prepared and measured meals and then re-measured their metabolic responses.

What did the researchers find?

In this particular article, the researchers reported finding that participant’s gut bacteria patterns fell into two groups. One of the groups had a much healthier metabolic response to the intervention meals than the other.

The group with the healthier metabolic response ate more unprocessed, whole foods (animal protein included) and the group with the worse metabolic response ate more processed foods.

This suggests that a healthy gut bacteria pattern is one of the links between eating whole foods and good general health.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

When we focus our family meals on less processed, whole foods, we’re promoting a healthy metabolism (weight, blood sugar, cholesterol) through building a healthy gut bacteria pattern.

Original Article:

Asnicar, F., Berry, S.E., Valdes, A.M. et al. Microbiome connections with host metabolism and habitual diet from 1,098 deeply phenotyped individuals. Nature Medicine (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-01183-8

Enjoying this article? Subscribe to the Yes Collective for more expert emotional wellness just for parents.

Discover Nourish

See more
New Research: A Whole Food Diet Leads to Better Health Through Good Gut Bacteria

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

New Research: A Whole Food Diet Leads to Better Health Through Good Gut Bacteria

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Podcast Ep. 60: Bringing "Woo" Into Therapy with Janell Cox, LMFT

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 60: Bringing "Woo" Into Therapy with Janell Cox, LMFT

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 59: The Power of Woo for Mental and Emotional Health with Jenny Walters, LMFT

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 59: The Power of Woo for Mental and Emotional Health with Jenny Walters, LMFT

By

Yes Collective

Podcast Ep. 58: Creating a Work/Life Wellness Culture with Organizational Psychologist, Avina Gupta, PhD

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 58: Creating a Work/Life Wellness Culture with Organizational Psychologist, Avina Gupta, PhD

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 57: Building More Work/Life Wholeness with Jenn Cornelius, Chief People Officer at Ritual

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 57: Building More Work/Life Wholeness with Jenn Cornelius, Chief People Officer at Ritual

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 56: Waking Up to Trauma and Healing as a Parent, Partner, and Person, with Tanner Wallace, PhD

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 56: Waking Up to Trauma and Healing as a Parent, Partner, and Person, with Tanner Wallace, PhD

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 55: Recovering from trauma with therapist and trauma-sensitive yoga facilitator Ruthie Duran Deffley, LCSW

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 55: Recovering from trauma with therapist and trauma-sensitive yoga facilitator Ruthie Duran Deffley, LCSW

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 53: How to find and nurture deep friendships with executive matchmaker, Sophy Singer

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 53: How to find and nurture deep friendships with executive matchmaker, Sophy Singer

By

The Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 52: Friendship & Emotional Health with Blake Blankenbecler, LPC and Jenny Walters, LMFT

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 52: Friendship & Emotional Health with Blake Blankenbecler, LPC and Jenny Walters, LMFT

By

The Yes Collective

Podcast Ep. 51 - "Best of Yes" with Sleep Scientist, Kate Simon, PhD

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 51 - "Best of Yes" with Sleep Scientist, Kate Simon, PhD

By

The Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 50 - Healing heart & mind through the body with somatic psychotherapist Betsy Powers

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 50 - Healing heart & mind through the body with somatic psychotherapist Betsy Powers

By

Yes Collective

Podcast Ep. 60: Bringing "Woo" Into Therapy with Janell Cox, LMFT

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 60: Bringing "Woo" Into Therapy with Janell Cox, LMFT

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 59: The Power of Woo for Mental and Emotional Health with Jenny Walters, LMFT

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 59: The Power of Woo for Mental and Emotional Health with Jenny Walters, LMFT

By

Yes Collective

Podcast Ep. 58: Creating a Work/Life Wellness Culture with Organizational Psychologist, Avina Gupta, PhD

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 58: Creating a Work/Life Wellness Culture with Organizational Psychologist, Avina Gupta, PhD

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 57: Building More Work/Life Wholeness with Jenn Cornelius, Chief People Officer at Ritual

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 57: Building More Work/Life Wholeness with Jenn Cornelius, Chief People Officer at Ritual

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 56: Waking Up to Trauma and Healing as a Parent, Partner, and Person, with Tanner Wallace, PhD

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 56: Waking Up to Trauma and Healing as a Parent, Partner, and Person, with Tanner Wallace, PhD

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 55: Recovering from trauma with therapist and trauma-sensitive yoga facilitator Ruthie Duran Deffley, LCSW

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 55: Recovering from trauma with therapist and trauma-sensitive yoga facilitator Ruthie Duran Deffley, LCSW

By

Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 53: How to find and nurture deep friendships with executive matchmaker, Sophy Singer

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 53: How to find and nurture deep friendships with executive matchmaker, Sophy Singer

By

The Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 52: Friendship & Emotional Health with Blake Blankenbecler, LPC and Jenny Walters, LMFT

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 52: Friendship & Emotional Health with Blake Blankenbecler, LPC and Jenny Walters, LMFT

By

The Yes Collective

Podcast Ep. 51 - "Best of Yes" with Sleep Scientist, Kate Simon, PhD

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 51 - "Best of Yes" with Sleep Scientist, Kate Simon, PhD

By

The Yes Collective Podcast

Podcast Ep. 50 - Healing heart & mind through the body with somatic psychotherapist Betsy Powers

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 50 - Healing heart & mind through the body with somatic psychotherapist Betsy Powers

By

Yes Collective

Subscribe to get all the goods

Join the app
Login